New York - Exhibition

America Is Hard to See

Whitney Museum of American Art

01 May 201527 Sep 2015

Drawn entirely from the Whitney Museum of American Art’s collection, America Is Hard to See takes the inauguration of the Museum’s new building designed by Renzo Piano as an opportunity to reexamine the history of art in the United States from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Comprising more than six hundred works, the exhibition elaborates the themes, ideas, beliefs, and passions that have galvanized American artists in their struggle to work within and against established conventions, often directly engaging their political and social contexts. Numerous pieces that have rarely, if ever, been shown appear alongside beloved icons in a conscious effort to unsettle assumptions about the American art canon.

The title, America Is Hard to See, comes from a poem by Robert Frost and a political documentary by Emile de Antonio. Metaphorically, the title seeks to celebrate the ever-changing perspectives of artists and their capacity to develop visual forms that respond to the culture of the United States. It also underscores the difficulty of neatly defining the country’s ethos and inhabitants, a challenge that lies at the heart of the Museum’s commitment to and continually evolving understanding of American art.

Organized chronologically, the exhibition’s narrative is divided into twenty- three thematic “chapters” installed throughout the building. These sections revisit and revise established tropes while forging new categories and even expanding the definition of who counts as an American artist. Indeed, each chapter takes its name not from a movement or style but from the title of a work that evokes the section’s animating impulse. Works of art across all mediums are displayed together, acknowledging the ways in which artists have engaged various modes of production and broken the boundaries between them.

  • Rachel Harrison, Claude Levi-Strauss, 2007. © 2007 Rachel HarrisonRachel Harrison, Claude Levi-Strauss, 2007. © 2007 Rachel Harrison
  • Donald Judd, Untitled, 1966. Donald Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York, NYDonald Judd, Untitled, 1966. Donald Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York, NY
  • Alexander Calder, Lion Tamer, Lion and Cage from Calder’s Circus, 1926-31. © 2015 The Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New YorkAlexander Calder, Lion Tamer, Lion and Cage from Calder’s Circus, 1926-31. © 2015 The Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Related Artists

Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder

Rachel Harrison

Donald Judd

Contacts & Details

OPENING:
mon, wed, thu, sun 10:30 am - 6:00 pm; fri, sat 10:30 am - 10:00 pm

CLOSING DAYS:
tue

ADMISSION:
Ticket

ESTABLISHED:
1930

OWNER/DIRECTOR:
D. Weinberg Adam


T: +1 (212) 570 3600 M: info@whitney.org W: Whitney Museum
ADDRESS:
99 Gansevoort Street New York, 10014 United States