São Paulo - Biennial

33rd Bienal de São Paulo: Twelve Individual Projects

Pavilhão Ciccillo Matarazzo

07 Sep 201809 Dec 2018

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Artist Alejandro Corujeira
Project Alejandro Corujeira has a light and fluid formal perception, which appears to want to capture the movement of nature. He is presenting sculptures and paintings at the exhibition.

Artist Aníbal López
Project Known as A-1 53167, the number on his ID card, he was one of the precursors of performance art in his country. His work, which includes video, performance, and urban interventions, among others, is strongly political and focused on disputes regarding national borders, indigenous cultures, military abuses and even the art market. The exhibition is composed of videos and photographs of ephemeral actions, conducted as a form of protest to the objectification and fetishising of art.

Artist Bruno Moreschi
Project Bruno Moreschi’s project for the 33rd Bienal offers an invitation to think unconventionally about the Bienal. He is creating an archive of experiences that are not those of an official archive, but by a set of documents resulting from the artist’s actions.

Artist Denise Milan
Project Denise Milan creates sculptures and installations with large stones and crystals. The 33rd Bienal features brand new artworks in this format.

Artist Feliciano Centurión
Project The world of queer art is addressed poetically by Feliciano Centurión who left his country of birth, Paraguay, to live in Argentina, where he became an exponent of the so-called “Rojas” generation (the first artists to show their
work at the gallery of the Centro Cultural Rector Ricardo Rojas, at Universidad de Buenos Aires) until he fell victim to AIDS-related complications, at 34 years of age. Centurión worked primarily with fabrics and embroidery, incorporating pieces such as handkerchiefs and crochet purchased in arts and crafts markets in Buenos Aires. Descended from a family of embroiderers, he appropriated craft as an artistic language to express elements of his personal history based on a family tradition common in Paraguayan culture.

Artist Lucia Nogueira
Project Still relatively unknown in Brazil, Lucia Nogueira is an essential figure in understanding British art of the period, and achieved international recognition in her short life. Her sculptures and installations subvert the utilitarianism of objects with subtle humour, unusual associations between elements, and wordplays in their titles, creating an atmosphere that is both disquieting and poetic.

Artist Luiza Crosman
Project Luiza Crosman’s project for the 33rd Bienal considers practices that are constitutive within the Bienal, but which do not necessarily need to remain unchanged. Collaborations with Zazie Edições, Pedro Moraes and Negalê Jones enter not only as the linking of a series of people in a project, but as a joint force of effects to tackle the question of scale.

Artist Maria Laet
Project The everyday is the inspiration behind the artworks produced by Maria Laet who is exhibiting a new video.

Artist Nelson Felix
Project Nelson Felix’s work for 33rd Bienal is made up by three moments. The first two (which are absent in the Bienal’s exhibition space) are a physical in the Americas that acts as a catalyst for the project; and a subsequent piece that synthetizes the work as a whole, placed in an outside space in the city of São Paulo. The third step, exhibited in the Bienal Pavilion, comprises a series of sculptures that were conceived by the artist as a ballad for the project.

Artist Siron Franco
Project The only living artist to exhibit historic work is Siron Franco with the series of paintings “Césio/Rua 57”. In this series, Franco internalises the impression of horror and isolation caused by a radiation accident which occurred in 1987 in Bairro Popular, in Goiânia, when a capsule of the radioactive element cesium-137 was accidently uncovered in an x-ray machine that was illegally abandoned in a rubbish dump. Born and raised in that neighbourhood, the artist returned to his native city shortly after the accident, leaving the Rio-São Paulo axis behind for good. His registers of the environmental catastrophe resulted in a significant turn in his career, which previously favoured figurative
irony, toward the use of allegory with symbolic elements.

Artist Tamar Guimarães
Project Taking a personal and poetic approach, Tamar Guimarães, who merges a critical institutional approach with poetic and narrative concerns, is presenting a new video.

Artist Vânia Mignone
Project The everyday life and Brazilian popular music are the inspiration behind the artworks produced by Vânia Mignone who is showing all new paintings.

  • FELICIANO CENTURIÓN, Divine Light of the Soul], c. 1996. Courtesy the Blanton Museum of Art (purchased with funds provided by Donald R. Mullins, Jr., 2004 – 2004.174). Photo: Rick Hall FELICIANO CENTURIÓN, Divine Light of the Soul], c. 1996. Courtesy the Blanton Museum of Art (purchased with funds provided by Donald R. Mullins, Jr., 2004 – 2004.174). Photo: Rick Hall
  • SOFIA BORGES, Pintura, Cérebro e Rosto [Painting, Brain, and Face], 2017. Courtesy the artist SOFIA BORGES, Pintura, Cérebro e Rosto [Painting, Brain, and Face], 2017. Courtesy the artist
  • © Tamar Guimarães, Courtesy of Bienal de São Paulo © Tamar Guimarães, Courtesy of Bienal de São Paulo

Contacts & Details

ADMISSION:
Free

T: +55 11 5576.7600 M: contato@bienal.org.br W: Bienal
ADDRESS:
Parque Ibirapuera Sao Paulo, Brazil