Mexico City - Exhibition

General Idea: Broken Time

Museo Jumex Arte Contemporáneo

27 Oct 201612 Feb 2017

The Museo Jumex presents the first retrospective of the Canadian collective General Idea in Latin America. The exhibition surveys their trajectory throughout a twentyfive-year career that grappled with such topics as communications systems, sexual diversity, race, disease, self-representation and the myth created around the collective itself.

General Idea was formed in 1969 by the artists A. A. Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal . The group produced an important body of work in different media and formats, opening new pathways and continuing to serve as a point of reference for current generations of artists around the world.

The exhibition features more than 120 pieces covering all of the media in which the group worked, including video art, photographs, publications, installations, and multiples of objects of mass consumption. The ideas and themes that inform this show are: the creation of myth in art as a reflection of society; the construction of identity; the non-linearity of history; fiction as an artistic resource; the construction of history through memory, archaeology and documents; sexuality; race; and AIDS and viralization as an artistic medium. General Idea grappled with these themes through advertising, design, fashion, beauty pageants, and the mass media.

  • General Idea, Playing Doctor, 1992. Courtesy of General Idea Estate. Photo: General IdeaGeneral Idea, Playing Doctor, 1992. Courtesy of General Idea Estate. Photo: General Idea

Related Artists

General Idea

Curators

Contacts & Details

OPENING:
tue, wed, thu, fri, sat, sun 11:00 am - 8:00 pm

CLOSING DAYS:
mon

ADMISSION:
General admission: $50; Mexican citizens: $30, Concession: $15 pesos; Free on Sunday

ESTABLISHED:
2013

SPACE:
2500 m2

OWNER/DIRECTOR:
González Julieta


T: +5255 5395 2615; +5255 5395 2618 M: info@museojumex.org W: Fundación Jumex
ADDRESS:
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra 303, Colonia Granada Mexico City, 11529 Mexico